3 years ago
Today we release Shedding’s Tear In The Sun LP. And never has there been a better time for this music. Chances are, if you turn this record on and gaze out your window, everything in life will synch right up. If just for 38 minutes.

This is a special one for us, a few years in the making and a collaboration with the artist himself (Shedding a.k.a. Connor Bell and his label, Ocio ) and Hometapes. Completing the triangle is Sonnenzimmer, the studio of Hometapes artist Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi. They brought the record to visual life, designing and screen printing the multi-color jacket that holds the transparent red vinyl LP (which you can see peeking out on the left side of the image below). Tear In The Sun is limited to 500 copies.

Today, and for a week only, you can stream Tear In The Sun for free. We’re also giving away an MP3 of one of our favorite tracks, "Perspective". We hope you will listen and pick up one of these exquisite objects. Read more about Shedding and the tale of Tear In The Sun below. 

FREE MP3 DOWNLOAD: Shedding “Perspective”
STREAM: Shedding Tear In The Sun in its entirety until December 14
BUY THE LP: Shedding Tear In The Sun limited edition vinyl (with MP3s)
BUY THE DIGITAL ALBUM: Shedding Tear In The Sun on iTunes
Connor Bell is unstuck in time. Walking the world as Shedding, he’s been creating music out of his Louisville, Kentucky, home from over a decade. His discography spans pristinely captured synth-based live sets, processed field recordings, dives into drone, and deconstructed rock music. And the timeline? It’s no line at all; Shedding is best attributed an infinity symbol. The new album, Tear In The Sun, was written and recorded in 2007. Assembled in 2010 in a limited edition package, it’s found the perfect time to appear…and to be the soundtrack for its own unearthing.

"The harmonium drones," writes Bell, explaining the core magnetism of the 19th century instrument that rings out as you settle into side A of Tear In The Sun. Joining that distinct organic sound is another, making its first-ever appearance on a Shedding album: Bell’s voice. The tones coalesce, not spiritually distant from the fusing of sampled bird songs and Eric Dolphy odes on Shedding’s What God Doesn’t Bless, You Won’t Love; What You Don’t Love, the Child Won’t Know, which The Wire described as “teetering at the edge of becoming a symphonic field recording.” That balancing act is Shedding’s art. And in the case of Tear In The Sun, one slip and that chasm below is deep.

Disconnect. Perspective. Idealize. Cauterize. Suffocate. Incineration. The track list for Tear In The Sun is your key to a story mapped across six movements. ”People crave the elegance of the black and white,” writes Bell, framing the archetypal tale of the album: man can no longer relate to the world, man leaves the world, man is exhilarated by his decision, man questions his decision, man is undermined by his decision, man is destroyed. The picture is somewhere between a moonwalk and a walkabout. 

Today we release Shedding’s Tear In The Sun LP. And never has there been a better time for this music. Chances are, if you turn this record on and gaze out your window, everything in life will synch right up. If just for 38 minutes.

This is a special one for us, a few years in the making and a collaboration with the artist himself (Shedding a.k.a. Connor Bell and his label, Ocio ) and Hometapes. Completing the triangle is Sonnenzimmer, the studio of Hometapes artist Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi. They brought the record to visual life, designing and screen printing the multi-color jacket that holds the transparent red vinyl LP (which you can see peeking out on the left side of the image below). Tear In The Sun is limited to 500 copies.

Today, and for a week only, you can stream Tear In The Sun for free. We’re also giving away an MP3 of one of our favorite tracks, "Perspective". We hope you will listen and pick up one of these exquisite objects. Read more about Shedding and the tale of Tear In The Sun below. 

Connor Bell is unstuck in time. Walking the world as Shedding, he’s been creating music out of his Louisville, Kentucky, home from over a decade. His discography spans pristinely captured synth-based live sets, processed field recordings, dives into drone, and deconstructed rock music. And the timeline? It’s no line at all; Shedding is best attributed an infinity symbol. The new album, Tear In The Sun, was written and recorded in 2007. Assembled in 2010 in a limited edition package, it’s found the perfect time to appear…and to be the soundtrack for its own unearthing.

"The harmonium drones," writes Bell, explaining the core magnetism of the 19th century instrument that rings out as you settle into side A of Tear In The Sun. Joining that distinct organic sound is another, making its first-ever appearance on a Shedding album: Bell’s voice. The tones coalesce, not spiritually distant from the fusing of sampled bird songs and Eric Dolphy odes on Shedding’s What God Doesn’t Bless, You Won’t Love; What You Don’t Love, the Child Won’t Know, which The Wire described as “teetering at the edge of becoming a symphonic field recording.” That balancing act is Shedding’s art. And in the case of Tear In The Sun, one slip and that chasm below is deep.

Disconnect. Perspective. Idealize. Cauterize. Suffocate. Incineration. The track list for Tear In The Sun is your key to a story mapped across six movements. ”People crave the elegance of the black and white,” writes Bell, framing the archetypal tale of the album: man can no longer relate to the world, man leaves the world, man is exhilarated by his decision, man questions his decision, man is undermined by his decision, man is destroyed. The picture is somewhere between a moonwalk and a walkabout. 


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